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Sega Games Co., Ltd.(JP)(CN) is a video game developer and publisher headquartered in Tokyo, Japan. The company is a subsidiary of Sega Holdings Co., Ltd., which is part of Sega Sammy Holdings. The name "Sega" is a portmanteau of "Service Games".

Sega's association with Nintendo goes back to 1976, when Sega introduced Wild Gunman and Shooting Trainer to North American players.[1] The two were also competitors in the home game console business until Sega left the business in 2001.

History

Founding

On June 3, 1960, two companies were established to take over the business activities of the dissolved Service Games Japan: Nihon Goraku Bussan Inc.(JP) and Nihon Kikai Seizo(JP). Kikai Seizo focused on manufacturing slot machines, while Goraku Bussan served as a distributor and operator of coin-operated machines, particularly jukeboxes. Their establishment was the result of Service Games Japan's legal issues with both the American and Japanese governments as well as its eventual dissolution. Kikai Seizo and Goraku Bussan merged in 1964.

In 1965, Nihon Goraku Bussan acquired a company known as Rosen Enterprises to form Sega Enterprises, Ltd.(JP). The head of Rosen Enterprises, David Rosen, was installed as the CEO and managing director of Sega. Shortly afterward, Sega focused on becoming a publicly-traded company of coin-operated amusement machines. Products imported included Rock-Ola jukeboxes and pinball games by Williams, as well as pinball and gun games by Midway Games. Because Sega imported second-hand machines that frequently required maintenance, Sega began the transition from importer to manufacturer by constructing replacement guns and flippers for its imported games. According to former Sega director Akira Nagai, this led to Sega developing their own games as well. Sega's first release of their own manufactured electromechanical game was the submarine simulator game, Periscope. The game sported light and sound effects considered innovative for that time, eventually becoming quite successful in Japan. It was soon exported to both Europe and the United States and was placed in malls and department stores, becoming the first arcade game in the US to cost 25 cents per play. Sega was surprised by Periscope's success, and for the next two years, Sega produced between eight and ten games per year, exporting all of them.

After dealing with financial struggles and rampant piracy, Sega was sold to American conglomerate Gulf and Western Industries in 1969. As a condition of the sale, Rosen was to remain CEO of the company until at least 1972.

In 1974, Gulf and Western made Sega a subsidiary of an American company renamed Sega Enterprises, Inc. In 1978, Sega acquired Gremlin Industries, a manufacturer of microprocessor-based arcade games, and renamed it Sega-Gremlin. Sega also acquired Esco Trading(JP), a coin-op distributor led by Hayao Nakayama(JP). Nakayama would become Sega's vice-president of distribution and he would be responsible for Sega's Japanese operations.

Association with Nintendo

Arcade titles

Sega introduced two of Nintendo's arcade titles to North American players in 1976 - Wild Gunman and Shooting Trainer.[1] Nintendo would create Head On N (1979), a licensed clone of Sega's arcade game Head On (1979). Space Firebird would be the last of Nintendo's arcade games Sega would release in North America.

Sega would collaborate with Nintendo and Namco to develop the Triforce arcade system. Sega would also go on to develop and distribute arcade titles using Nintendo's franchises, including F-Zero AX and Rhythm Tengoku.

SG-1000

With it's arcade business in decline, Gulf and Western executives turned to Nakayama for advice on how to proceed. Nakayama advocated that the company leverage its hardware expertise gained through years working in the arcade industry to move into the home console market in Japan, which was in its infancy. Nakayama received permission to proceed, leading to the release of the SG-1000. The first model to be developed was the SC-3000, a computer version with a built-in keyboard, but when Sega learned of Nintendo's plans to release a games-only console, they began developing the SG-1000 alongside the SC-3000. The SG-1000 and SC-3000 were released in Japan on July 15, 1983, on the same day as Nintendo launched the Family Computer (Famicom) in Japan. Though Sega only released the SG-1000 in Japan, rebranded versions were released in several other markets worldwide.

Due in part to the SG-1000's steadier stream of releases, and in part to a recall on Famicom units necessitated by a faulty circuit, the SG-1000 chalked up 160,000 units in sales in 1983, far exceeding Sega's projection of 50,000 units.

Shortly after the launch of the SG-1000, Gulf and Western began to divest itself of its non-core businesses, so Nakayama and Rosen arranged a management buyout of the Japanese subsidiary in April 1984 with financial backing from Computer Service, Inc.(JP) (later known as CSK), a prominent Japanese software company. The Japanese assets of Sega were purchased for $38 million by a group of investors led by Rosen and Nakayama. Isao Okawa(JP), chairman of CSK, became the chairman of Sega, while Nakayama was installed as CEO of Sega Enterprises, Ltd.

Sega Mark III/Master System

Sega Master System

Sega Master System

As a result of the lack of success of the SG-1000, Sega began working on the Mark III in Japan in 1985. Engineered by the same internal Sega team that had created the SG-1000, the Mark III was a redesigned iteration of the previous console. For the console's North America release, Sega restyled and rebranded the Mark III under the name "Master System". The futuristic final design for the Master System was intended to appeal to Western tastes.

The Sega Mark III was released in Japan on October 20, 1985 at a price of ¥15,000. Despite featuring technically more powerful hardware than its chief competition, the Famicom, the Mark III did not prove to be successful at its launch. Difficulties arose from Nintendo's licensing practices with third-party developers at the time, whereby Nintendo required that titles for the Famicom not be published on other consoles. To overcome this, Sega developed its own titles and obtained the rights to port games from other developers, but they did not sell well.

Contrary to its performance in Japan and North America, the Master System eventually outsold the NES by a considerable margin in Europe. As late as 1993, the Master System's active installed user base in Europe was 6.25 million units. The Master System has had continued success in Brazil, where new variations have continued to be released long after the console was discontinued elsewhere, distributed by Tectoy.

Mega Drive/Sega Genesis

Sg

Sega Genesis

Sega released the Mega Drive in Japan on October 29, 1988, though the launch was overshadowed by Nintendo's release of Super Mario Bros. 3 six days earlier. Positive coverage from magazines Famitsu and Beep! helped to establish a following, but Sega only managed to ship 400,000 units in the first year. The Mega Drive was unable to overtake the venerable Famicom and remained a distant third in Japan behind Nintendo's Super Famicom and NEC's PC Engine, though the PC Engine was discontinued in 1994. Sega announced a North American release date for the system on January 9, 1989. The console was renamed "Sega Genesis". Former Atari executive and new Sega of America CEO Michael Katz instituted a two-part approach to build sales in the region. The first part involved a marketing campaign to challenge Nintendo head-on and emphasize the more arcade-like experience available on the Genesis, summarized by slogans including "Genesis does what Nintendon't". Since Nintendo owned the console rights to most arcade games of the time, the second part involved creating a library of instantly recognizable games which used the names and likenesses of celebrities and athletes. Nonetheless, it had a hard time overcoming Nintendo's ubiquitous presence in consumers' homes. Tasked by Nakayama to sell one million units within the first year, Katz and Sega of America managed to sell only 500,000 units.

While Sega was seeking a flagship series to compete with Nintendo's Mario series along with a character to serve as a company mascot, Naoto Ohshima designed "a teal hedgehog with red shoes that he called "Mr. Needlemouse." The character was renamed Sonic the Hedgehog. The gameplay of Sonic the Hedgehog originated with a tech demo created by Yuji Naka, who had developed an algorithm that allowed a sprite to move smoothly on a curve by determining its position with a dot matrix. Naka's original prototype was a platform game that involved a fast-moving character rolling in a ball through a long winding tube, and this concept was subsequently fleshed out with Ohshima's character design and levels conceived by designer Hirokazu Yasuhara. Sonic's blue pigmentation was chosen to match Sega's cobalt blue logo, and his shoes were a concept evolved from a design inspired by Michael Jackson's boots with the addition of the color red, which was inspired by both Santa Claus and the contrast of those colors on Jackson's 1987 album Bad; his personality was based on Bill Clinton's "can do" attitude.

In mid-1990, Nakayama hired Tom Kalinske to replace Katz as CEO of Sega of America. Although Kalinske initially knew little about the video game market, he surrounded himself with industry-savvy advisors. A believer in the razor and blades business model, he developed a four-point plan: cut the price of the console, create a U.S.-based team to develop games targeted at the American market, continue and expand the aggressive advertising campaigns, and replace the bundled game Altered Beast with a new game, Sonic the Hedgehog. The Japanese board of directors initially disapproved of the plan, but all four points were approved by Nakayama, who told Kalinske, "I hired you to make the decisions for Europe and the Americas, so go ahead and do it." Magazines praised Sonic as one of the greatest games yet made, and Sega's console finally became successful. In large part due to the popularity of Sonic the Hedgehog, the Sega Genesis outsold its main competitor, Nintendo's SNES, in the United States nearly two to one during the 1991 holiday season. This success led to Sega having control of 65% of the 16-bit console market in January 1992, making it the first time Nintendo was not the console leader since December 1985.

In the end, Sega was able to outsell Nintendo four Christmas seasons in a row due to the Genesis' head start, a lower price point, and a larger library of games when compared to the Super Nintendo at its release. Sega's advertising positioned the Genesis as the cooler console, and as its advertising evolved, the company coined the term "blast processing" to suggest that its processing capabilities were far greater than those of the SNES. However, all of that alone couldn't beat Nintendo’s SNES which has done better than Sega’s Genesis. According to a 2014 Wedbush Securities report based on revised NPD sales data, the SNES still outsold the Genesis in the U.S. market.

Game Gear

In 1990, Sega launched the Game Gear to compete against Nintendo's Game Boy. The console had been designed as a portable version of the Mark III, and featured more powerful systems than the Game Boy, including a full-color screen, in contrast to the monochromatic screen of its rival. Due to issues with its short battery life, lack of original games, and weak support from Sega, the Game Gear was unable to surpass the Game Boy, selling approximately 11 million units.

Mega CD/Sega CD

By 1991, compact discs had gained in popularity as a data storage device for music and software. PCs and video game companies had started to make use of this technology. NEC had been the first to include CD technology in a game console with the release of the PC Engine CD-ROM add-on, and Nintendo was making plans to develop its own CD peripheral as well. Seeing the opportunity to gain an advantage over its rivals, Sega partnered with JVC to develop a CD-ROM add-on for the Mega Drive. Sega launched the Mega-CD in Japan on December 1, 1991, initially retailing at JP¥49,800. The CD add-on was launched in North America on October 15, 1992, as the Sega CD, with a retail price of US$299; it was released in Europe as the Mega-CD in 1993. In addition to greatly expanding the potential size of its games, this add-on unit upgraded the graphics and sound capabilities by adding a second, more powerful processor, more system memory, and hardware-based scaling and rotation similar to that found in Sega's arcade games. The Mega-CD sold only 100,000 units during its first year in Japan, falling well below expectations. Although many consumers blamed the add-on's high launch price, it also suffered from a small software library; only two games were available at launch. This was due in part to the long delay before Sega made its software development kit available to third-party developers. Sales were more successful in North America and Europe, although the novelty of full motion video (FMV) and CD-enhanced games quickly wore off as many of the Mega-CD's later games were met with lukewarm or negative reviews.

Saturn

Ssaturn

Sega Saturn

Development on Sega's next video game console, the Sega Saturn, started over two years before the system was showcased at the Tokyo Toy Show in June 1994. The name "Saturn" was the system's codename during development in Japan, but was chosen as the official product name. According to Kalinske, Sega of America "fought against the architecture of Saturn for quite some time". Seeking an alternative graphics chip for the Saturn, Kalinske attempted to broker a deal with Silicon Graphics, but Sega of Japan rejected the proposal. Kalinske, Sony Electronic Publishing's Olaf Olafsson, and Sony America's Micky Schulhof had discussed development of a joint "Sega/Sony hardware system", which never came to fruition due to Sega's desire to create hardware that could accommodate both 2D and 3D visuals and Sony's competing notion of focusing on 3D technology. Publicly, Kalinske defended the Saturn's design: "Our people feel that they need the multiprocessing to be able to bring to the home what we're doing next year in the arcades." To ensure high-quality 3D games would be available early in the Saturn's life, developers from Sega's arcade division were asked to create Saturn games.

Sega released the Saturn in Japan on November 22, 1994, at a price of ¥44,800. Virtua Fighter, a faithful port of the popular arcade game, sold at a nearly one-to-one ratio with the Saturn console at launch and was crucial to the system's early success in Japan. Fueled by the popularity of Virtua Fighter, Sega's initial shipment of 200,000 Saturn units sold out on the first day, and was more popular than the PlayStation in Japan. In March 1995, Sega of America CEO Tom Kalinske announced that the Saturn would be released in the U.S. on "Saturnday" (Saturday) September 2, 1995. However, Sega of Japan mandated an early launch to give the Saturn an advantage over the PlayStation. The events that followed led to fractured relationships between Sega and retailers, multiple price reductions of the Saturn, and financial loss.

Despite the loss, the Sega Saturn would end up outselling the Nintendo 64 in Japan.

Dreamcast

Sd

Sega Dreamcast

Dreamcast

The Dreamcast attracted significant interest and drew many pre-orders. Sega announced that Sonic Adventure, the next game starring company mascot Sonic the Hedgehog, would arrive in time for the Dreamcast's launch and promoted the game with a large-scale public demonstration at the Tokyo Kokusai Forum Hall. However, Sega could not achieve its shipping goals for the Dreamcast's Japanese launch due to a shortage of PowerVR chipsets caused by a high failure rate in the manufacturing process. As more than half of its limited stock had been pre-ordered, Sega stopped pre-orders in Japan. On November 27, 1998, the Dreamcast launched in Japan at a price of JP¥29,000, and the entire stock sold out by the end of the day. However, of the four games available at launch, only one—a port of Virtua Fighter 3, the most successful arcade game Sega ever released in Japan—sold well. Irimajiri hoped to sell over 1 million Dreamcast units in Japan by February 1999, but less than 900,000 were sold, undermining Sega's attempts to build up a sufficient installed base to ensure the Dreamcast's survival after the arrival of competition from other manufacturers. Prior to the Western launch, Sega reduced the price of the Dreamcast to JP¥19,900, effectively making the hardware unprofitable but increasing sales.

Poor Japanese sales contributed to Sega's ¥42.88 billion ($404 million) consolidated net loss in the fiscal year ending March 2000, which followed a similar loss of ¥42.881 billion the previous year and marked Sega's third consecutive annual loss. Although Sega's overall sales for the term increased 27.4%, and international Dreamcast sales greatly exceeded the company's expectations, this increase in sales coincided with a decrease in profitability due to the investments required to launch the Dreamcast in Western markets and poor software sales in Japan. Sega's attempts to spur increased Dreamcast sales through lower prices and cash rebates caused escalating financial losses.

Shift to third party development

In 2000, Sega and CSK Corporation chairman Isao Okawa replaced Irimajiri as president of Sega. Irimajiri had been replaced as a result of Sega's financial losses. Okawa had long advocated that Sega abandon the console business. His sentiments were not unique; Sega co-founder David Rosen had "always felt it was a bit of a folly for them to be limiting their potential to Sega hardware", and Stolar had previously suggested that Sega should have sold their company to Microsoft. In September 2000, in a meeting with Sega's Japanese executives and the heads of the company's major Japanese game development studios, Moore and Bellfield recommended that Sega abandon its console business and focus on software—prompting the studio heads to walk out. On November 1, 2000, Sega changed its company name from Sega Enterprises to Sega Corporation.

On January 23, 2001, a story ran in Nihon Keizai Shimbun claiming that Sega would cease production of the Dreamcast and develop software for other platforms. After initial denial, Sega of Japan put out a press release confirming they were considering producing software for the PlayStation 2 and Game Boy Advance as part of their "new management policy". On January 31, 2001, Sega announced the discontinuation of the Dreamcast after March 31 and the restructuring of the company as a "platform-agnostic" third-party developer. Sega also announced a Dreamcast price reduction to $99 to eliminate its unsold inventory, which was estimated at 930,000 units as of April 2001. After a further reduction to $79, the Dreamcast was cleared out of stores at $49.95. The final Dreamcast unit manufactured was autographed by the heads of all nine of Sega's internal game development studios as well as the heads of Visual Concepts and Wave Master and given away with 55 first-party Dreamcast games through a competition organized by GamePro magazine. Okawa, who had previously loaned Sega $500 million in the summer of 1999, died on March 16, 2001; shortly before his death, he forgave Sega's debts to him and returned his $695 million worth of Sega and CSK stock, helping the company survive the third-party transition. He also talked to Microsoft about a sale or merger with their Xbox division, but those talks failed. As part of this restructuring, nearly one-third of Sega's Tokyo workforce was laid off in 2001. By March 31, 2002, Sega had five consecutive fiscal years of net losses.

Merging into Sega-Sammy

In August 2003, Sammy Corporation, a pachinko manufacturing company, purchased 22.4% of Sega's shares while Sega focused on their arcade business, starting their move to takeover the company. In 2004, Sammy purchased a controlling share and the companies merged into Sega Sammy. Over the next decade, Sega retreated from the Global market with them selling or closing many of their Western studios and several Dreamcast-era studios. They found larger success in certain Japanese focused franchises like Yakuza and Hatsune Miku while relying on steady success of Sonic the Hedgehog. During this time, Sega of Europe also happened to strengthen with the PC market growing and the success of the Football Manager series. In 2013, Sega purchased the Index Corporation, the parent company to Atlus.

In 2015, Sega Corporation reorganized into the Sega Group as one of the three groups in Sega Sammy Holdings and restructured their divisions into 4 sectors under Sega Holdings. The main game division were put into Sega Games, which works on home video games, and Sega Interactive, which operates the arcade division. In 2020, these two divisions will simply merged into Sega Corporation while Sega Holdings will be renamed to Sega Group Corporation.

Subsidiaries

  • Sega CS1 R&D (includes Ryu Ga Gotoku Studio)
  • Sega CS2 R&D (includes Sonic Team)
  • Sega AM1 (Arcade games)
  • Sega AM2 (Arcade games)
  • Atlus (2013 -)
  • Visual Concepts (1999- 2005)
  • Creative Assembly (2005 - )
  • Sports Interactive (2006 - )
  • Two Point Studios (2019 - )

Games released by Sega for Nintendo systems

Franchises

List

Main article: List of Sega games
Title Format Release Date
Amazing IslandGameCube2004-08August 2004
Beach Spikers: Virtua Beach VolleyballGameCube2002-08August 2002
Billy Hatcher and the Giant EggGameCube2003-09September 2003
Bleach GC: Tasogare ni Mamieru ShinigamiGameCube2005-12December 2005
Chaos FieldGameCube2005-12December 2005
College Basketball 2K2GameCubeCanceled
Crazy TaxiGameCube2001-11November 2001
Derby Tsuku 4: Derby Uma o Tsukurō!GameCube2003-12December 2003
Gekitō Pro YakyūGameCube2003-09September 2003
Home Run KingGameCube2002-03March 2002
NBA 2K2GameCube2002-03March 2002
NBA 2K3GameCube2002-10October 2002
NCAA College Basketball 2K3GameCube2002-12December 2002
NCAA College Football 2K3GameCube2002-09September 2002
NFL 2K3GameCube2002-08August 2002
NHL 2K3GameCube2002-12December 2002
Phantasy Star Online Episode I & IIGameCube2002-10October 2002
Phantasy Star Online Episode I & II PlusGameCube2004-09September 2004
Phantasy Star Online Episode III: C.A.R.D. RevolutionGameCube2004-03March 2004
Puyo Pop FeverGameCube2004-07July 2004
Samurai Jack: The Shadow of AkuGameCube2004-03March 2004
Sega Soccer SlamGameCube2002-03March 2002
Shadow the HedgehogGameCube2005-11November 2005
Skies of Arcadia LegendsGameCube2003-01January 2003
Sonic Adventure 2 BattleGameCube2002-02February 2002
Sonic Adventure DX: Director's CutGameCube2003-06June 2003
Sonic Gems CollectionGameCube2005-08August 2005
Sonic HeroesGameCube2004-01January 2004
Sonic Mega CollectionGameCube2002-11November 2002
Sonic RidersGameCube2006-02February 2006
Spartan: Total WarriorGameCube2005-10October 2005
Super Monkey BallGameCube2001-11November 2001
Super Monkey Ball 2GameCube2002-08August 2002
Super Monkey Ball 2-PackGameCube2004-10October 2004
Super Monkey Ball AdventureGameCube2006-08August 2006
TankersGameCubeCanceled
The Incredibles: Rise of the UnderminerGameCube2005-11November 2005
Virtua QuestGameCube2005-01January 2005
Virtua Striker 2002GameCube2002-05May 2002
World Series Baseball 2K3GameCubeCanceled
Worms 3DGameCube2004-03March 2004
428: Fūsa Sareta Shibuya deWii2008-12December 2008
Alien SyndromeWii2007-07July 2007
Bleach: Shattered BladeWii2007-10October 2007
Bleach: Versus CrusadeWii2008-12December 2008
Captain America: Super SoldierWii2011-07July 2011
Chin-Douchuu!! Paul no DaiboukenWiiWare2009-02February 2009
Conduit 2Wii2011-04April 2011
Daisy Fuentes PilatesWii2009-08August 2009
Doraemon Wii: Himitsu Douguou KetteisenWii2007-12December 2007
Ghost SquadWii2007-11November 2007
Gunblade NY & L.A. Machineguns Arcade Hits PackWii2010-08August 2010
Imabikisō Kaimei HenWii2008-08August 2008
Iron ManWii2008-05May 2008
Iron Man 2Wii2010-05May 2010
Jambo! Safari: Animal RescueWii2009-11November 2009
Jissen Pachi-Slot Pachinko Hisshôhô! Hokuto no KenWii2007-05May 2007
Let's CatchWiiWare2009-06June 2009
Let's TAPWii2009-06June 2009
MadWorldWii2009-03March 2009
Mario & Sonic at the London 2012 Olympic GamesWii2011-11November 2011
Mario & Sonic at the Olympic GamesWii2007-11November 2007
Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Winter GamesWii2009-10October 2009
Miburi & TeburiWii2008-02February 2008
Nancy Drew: The White Wolf of Icicle CreekWii2008-12December 2008
NiGHTS: Journey of DreamsWii2007-12December 2007
Planet 51Wii2009-11November 2009
Pole's Big AdventureWii2009-02February 2009
Puyo Puyo 7Wii2009-11November 2009
Puyo Puyo! 15th AnniversaryWii2007-07July 2007
Puyo Puyo!! 20th AnniversaryWii2011-12December 2011
Samba de AmigoWii2008-09September 2008
Sega Bass FishingWii2008-02February 2008
Sega Fun Pack: Sonic and the Secret Rings / Super Monkey Ball: Banana BlitzWii2009-03March 2009
Sega Superstars TennisWii2008-03March2008
Shiren the WandererWii2010-02February 2010
Sonic & Sega All-Stars RacingWii2010-02February 2010
Sonic and the Black KnightWii2009-03March 2009
Sonic and the Secret RingsWii2007-02February 2007
Sonic Colors Wii 2010-11November 2010
Sonic Riders: Zero GravityWii2008-01January 2008
Sonic the Hedgehog 4: Episode IWiiWare2010-10October 2010
Sonic the Hedgehog 4: Episode IIWiiWareCanceled
Sonic UnleashedWii2008-11November 2008
Super Monkey Ball: Banana BlitzWii2006-11November 2006
Super Monkey Ball: Step & RollWii2010-02February 2010
Suzumiya Haruhi no HeiretsuWii2009-03March 2009
The ConduitWii2009-06June 2009
The Golden CompassWii2007-12December 2007
The House of the Dead 2 & 3 ReturnWii2008-03March 2008
The House of the Dead: OverkillWii2009-02February 2009
The Incredible HulkWii2008-06June 2008
Thor: God of ThunderWii2011-05May 2011
Tournament of LegendsWii2010-07July 2010
Virtua Tennis 2009Wii2009-06June 2009
Virtua Tennis 4Wii2011-05May 2011
Wacky World of SportsWii2009-09September 2009
Mario & Sonic at the Rio 2016 Olympic GamesWii U2016-06June 2016
Mario & Sonic at the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter GamesWii U2013-11November 2013
Puyo Puyo TetrisWii U2014-02February 2014
Ryū ga Gotoku 1 & 2 HD for Wii U Wii U 2013-08August 2013
Sonic & All-Stars Racing TransformedWii U2012-11November 2012
Sonic Boom: Rise of LyricWii U2014-11November 2014
Sonic Lost WorldWii U2013-10October 2013
The Cave Wii U 2013-01-22January 2013
Phantasy Star Online 2: Cloud Switch 2018-04-02April 2018
Puyo Puyo TetrisSwitch2017-04April 2017
Puyo Puyo Champions Switch 2019-05May 2019
Shining Resonance Refrain Switch 2018Summer 2018
Sonic ForcesSwitch2017-11November 2017
Sonic ManiaSwitch2017-08August 2017
Sonic Mania Plus Switch Summer 2018
Super Monkey Ball: Banana Blitz HD Switch 2019-10October 2019
Team Sonic Racing Switch 2019-05May 2019
Valkyrie Chronicles Switch 2018-MONTHFall 2018
Valkyrie Chronicles 4 Switch 2018-MONTHSummer 2018
Sakura Taisen GB2GBC2001-12December 2001
2 Games in 1: Sonic Advance + Sonic BattleGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
2 Games In 1: Sonic Pinball Party + Sonic BattleGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
2 Games In 1: Sonic Pinball Party / Columns CrownGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Altered Beast: Guardian of the RealmsGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Astro Boy: Omega FactorGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Baseball AdvanceGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Bleach AdvanceGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Charlotte's WebGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
ChuChu Rocket!GBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Columns CrownGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Columns Crown / ChuChu Rocket!GBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Combo Pack: Sonic Advance & Sonic Pinball PartyGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Comix ZoneGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Double Pack: Sonic Advance & ChuChu Rocket!GBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Gunstar Super HeroesGBA2005-10October 2005
J-League Pro Soccer Club o Tsukurou! AdvanceGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Jet Grind RadioGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Konchuu Ouja Mushiking: Greatest Champion e no MichiGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Lilliput Oukoku: Lillimoni to Issho-puni!GBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Pro Yakyuu Team o Tsukurou! AdvanceGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Puyo PopGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Puyo Pop FeverGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sega Arcade GalleryGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sega Rally ChampionshipGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Shining Force: Resurrection of the Dark DragonGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Shining SoulGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Shining Soul IIGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sonic AdvanceGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sonic Advance 2GBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sonic Advance 3GBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sonic BattleGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sonic Pinball PartyGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sonic the Hedgehog: GenesisGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
The Incredibles: Rise of the UnderminerGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
The Pinball of the DeadGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
The Revenge of ShinobiGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
The Tower SPGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Virtua TennisGBAYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
7th DragonDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Aliens: InfestationDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Bakugan: Defenders of the CoreDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Blazer DriveDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Bleach DS 4th: Flame BringerDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Bleach: Dark SoulsDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Bleach: The 3rd PhantomDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Bleach: The Blade of FateDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Brain AssistDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Captain America: Super SoldierDS2011-07July 2011
Card de Asobu! Hajimete no DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Charlotte's WebDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Culdcept DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Dinosaur KingDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Doraemon: Nobita no Kyouryuu 2006 DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Doraemon: Nobita no Shin Makai Daibouken DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Doraemon: Nobita to Midori no Kyojinden DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Dramatic Dungeon: Sakura Taisen - Kimi ArugatameDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
English of the DeadDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Feel the Magic: XY/XXDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Finding Nemo: Escape to the Big BlueDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Fushigi no Dungeon: Fuurai no Shiren DS 2 - Sabaku no MajouDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Infinite SpaceDS2010-03March 2010
Iron ManDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Iron Man 2DSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Jambo! Safari: Animal RescueDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Jissen Pachi-Slot Hisshouhou! DS: Aladdin II EvolutionDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Jissen Pachi-Slot Hisshouhou! Hokuto no Ken SE DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Kaite Oboeru: Dora-GanaDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Kouchuu Ouja Mushi King: Greatest Champion e no Michi 2DSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Kouchuu Ouja Mushi King: Greatest Champion e no Michi DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Kouchuu Ouja: Mushi King Super CollectionDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Lilpri DS: Hime-Chen! Apple PinkDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Mainichi Shinbun 1000 Dai-NewsDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Mario & Sonic at the Olympic GamesDS2007-11November 2007
Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Winter GamesDS2009-10October 2009
Mind Quiz: Your Brain CoachDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Mystery Dungeon: Shiren the WandererDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Nippon no Shiken Taizen DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Onsei Kanjou Sokuteiki: Kokoro ScanDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Oshare Majo Love and Berry: DS CollectionDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Oshiri Kajiri Mushi no Rhythm Lesson DS: Kawai Ongaku Kyoushitsu KanshuuDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Phantasy Star ZeroDS2009-11November 2009
Phantasy Star Zero MiniDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
PictoImageDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Planet 51DSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Pro Yakyuu Team o Tsukurou!DSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Pro Yakyuu Team o Tsukurou! 2DSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Puyo Pop FeverDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Puyo Puyo 7DSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Puyo Puyo Fever 2DSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Puyo Puyo! 15th AnniversaryDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Puyo Puyo!! 20th AnniversaryDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Rekishi Taisen Gettenka: Tenkaichi Battle RoyaleDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Saitou Takashi no DS de Yomu Sanshoku Ball-Pen Meisaku JukuDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Saka-Tsuku DS: Touch and DirectDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
San Goku Shi Taisen DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
San Goku Shi Taisen TenDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sands of DestructionDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sega CasinoDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sega Superstars TennisDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Shikaku Kentei DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Shining Force FeatherDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Shiseido Beauty Solution Kaihatsu Center Kanshuu: Project BeautyDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Soccer Tsuku DS: World Challenge 2010DSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sonic & Sega All-Stars RacingDS2010-02February 2010
Sonic Chronicles: The Dark BrotherhoodDS2008-09September 2008
Sonic Classic CollectionDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sonic ColorsDS2010-11November 2010
Sonic RushDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Sonic Rush AdventureDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Super Monkey Ball Touch & RollDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Suzumiya Haruhi no ChokuretsuDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
The Golden CompassDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
The Hardy Boys: Treasure on the TracksDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
The Incredible HulkDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
The Incredibles: Rise of the UnderminerDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
The Rub Rabbits!DSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Thor: God of ThunderDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Touch DartsDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Touch de Zuno! DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
U-Can Pen Ji Training DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Yume Neko DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
Zoo Tycoon DSDSYEAR-MONTHMONTH YEAR
7th Dragon III Code: VFD 3DS 2015-10October 2015
Captain America: Super Soldier3DS2011-10October 2011
CRUSH3D3DS2012-03March 2012
Hatsune Miku and Future Stars: Project Mirai3DS2012-03March 2012
Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX 3DS 2015-09September 2015
Hero Bank 3DS 2014-03March 2014
Hero Bank 2 3DS 2014-11November 2014
Mario & Sonic at the London 2012 Olympic Games3DS2012-02February 2012
Mario & Sonic at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games3DS2016-03March 2016
Puyo Puyo!! 20th Anniversary3DS2011-12December 2011
Puyo Puyo Tetris3DS2014-02February 2014
Puyo Puyo Chronicle3DS2016-12December 2016
Rhythm Thief & the Emperor's Treasure3DS2012-07July 2012
Sega 3D Fukkoku Archives 3DS 2014-12December 2014
SEGA 3D Classics Collection 3DS 2016-04April 2016
SEGA 3D Fukkoku Archives 3: Final Stage 3DS 2016-12December 2016
Shinobi3DS2011-11November 2011
Sonic & All-Stars Racing Transformed3DS2011-02February 2013
Sonic Boom: Shattered Crystal3DS2014-11November 2014
Sonic Boom: Fire & Ice3DS2016-09September 2016
Sonic Generations3DS2011-11November 2011
Sonic Lost World3DS2013-10October 2013
Stella Glow 3DS 2015-06June 2015
Super Monkey Ball 3D3DS2011-03March 2011
Thor: God of Thunder3DS2011-09September 2011

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "SEGA Introduces Two New Games" - Cash Box Magazine (4/24/1976)

External links

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