FANDOM


(Adding header)
 
(2 intermediate revisions by 2 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{Head
 
{{Head
| type =
+
| type = Accessory
 
| quote =
 
| quote =
 
| speaker =
 
| speaker =
 
| stub =
 
| stub =
| class =
+
| class = }}
}}
+
[[File:SNEScd.jpg|thumb|One design for the SNES CD-ROM was an add-on, akin to the Sega CD for the Genesis/Mega Drive.]]The''' SNES CD-ROM''' was a planned CD drive for the SNES, similar to the Sega CD. It was developed by Nintendo together with Sony. Eventually the SNES-CD became the standalone Play Station, which took both SNES cartridges and CD-ROMs. However, Sony wanted the full rights to all games published for the SNES CD, so Nintendo instead went with Philips. One day after the Play Station announcement at CES 1991, Nintendo revealed its partnership with Philips.
[[Image:SNEScd.jpg|thumb|right|The design Nintendo was aiming for. As you can see it featured a slot for both SNES and CD-ROM games.]]
 
The '''SNES CD-Rom''' is an infamous addition to the [[SNES]] that ultimately never saw the light of day. It did, however, see many ups and downs and a multitude of collaborations with companies such as Sony and Philips, though nothing ended up working to the way [[Nintendo]] wanted it to, and oddly neither this nor the hope for CD based games on the [[Nintendo 64]] were ever fulfilled.
 
   
==Development==
+
[[File:SNES-PlayStation.jpg|thumb|Another design for the unit. This one was a standalone device, containing both Super Famicom hardware and the Super Disc CD drive.]]
  +
Sony and Nintendo attempted to repair relations between each other, and in the end, Sony was allowed to continue development on SNES-compatible hardware. However, Sony decided later to create its own, competing console based on the Play Station. This eventually became the current Sony PlayStation. Philips' version of the SNES-CD later became the infamous CD-i.
   
Nintendo first intended to release a CD based addon for the SNES in [[1991]], and planned to do so with Philips. Philips would give Nintendo CD players to work with while they Philips in return would also be given licensing rights to various Nintendo properties. The ensuing games released on the Philips CD-I weren't impressive and are still considered some of the most infamous video games ever released, primarily because of the fact that these terrible games featured some of the most memorable video game characters. Long story short, the deal didn't go as planned and Nintendo instead went over to Sony, who happened to be quite the competition for Philips.
+
==History==
[[Image:PlayStation.jpg|thumb|left|There was an immense possibility that Nintendo would've helped with the making of this console. And in fact they did - without their semi-contributions to it it may never have been released.]]
 
Sony and Nintendo planned to release the PlayStation (now a household name - though not because of Nintendo). The PlayStation could play both discs and SNES cartridges. These discs were obviously more impressive than the cartridges, and were rightfully called "Super Discs". However, things went utterly wrong when Nintendo found that a deal with Sony that occurred way back in 1988 gave Sony full control on all games played on a CD for this new collaboration.
 
   
While claiming not to have abandoned Sony and the PlayStation, Nintendo went back to Philips to announce that they were also back together due to superior technology, as Nintendo gracefully put it. Nintendo at the same time explained that this new collaboration, or rather a resurrection of a previous collaboration, wouldn't effect the bond Nintendo and Sony had once Sony threatened to sue.
+
Nintendo first courted Sony to develop a CD-based console in 1988, after both Sony and Philips had pitched their ideas to Nintendo. Nintendo decided to work with Sony, and development resulted first in the SNES-CD, a CD drive attachment for the SNES, and later the Play Station, a console that took both SNES cartridges and CD-ROMs. The Play Station was shown at the 1991 Consumer Electronics Show.
   
Well, come C.E.S. in 1991, Sony expected that Nintendo would promote the PlayStation as much as possible. That didn't turn about to be the case when Nintendo announced their exclusive devotion to Philips. In short, it made Sony extremely angry, stating that Nintendo had violated their deal, which technically they had.
+
However, Sony's contract with Nintendo gave them the full rights to every game published for the device, so Nintendo then went with Philips. The deal was announced one day after the Play Station announcement.
   
Next, Sony knew they could manage on their own without the help from Nintendo, and thus announced the Sony PlayStation at TIES. The new console was described by Sony as both an education tool and a game machine. While no games were announced, they had explained that SNES cartridges would still be able to play on it. Come 1992 Nintendo confirmed that they will not work with Sony, and explained their devotion to Philips.
+
[[File:PlayStation.jpg|thumb|left|This was the console that Nintendo inadvertently created - the Sony Playstation. It dominated the 64-bit era, trouncing Nintendo's own console, the Nintendo 64. Without their contributions it may never have been released, and Nintendo would have never gained its strongest rival.]]
  +
  +
Though Philips continued to work with Nintendo, Sony and Nintendo tried to make up with each other, and Nintendo eventually agreed to allow Sony to produce SNES-compatible hardware. Miffed by Nintendo's abandonment, Sony instead took the Play Station and turned it into its own standalone console, one which would eventually beat Nintendo's machine in the 64-bit era.
  +
  +
Nintendo then broke its deal with Philips, leaving itself with no CD drive in development. Philips was allowed to continue development on the device and, as appeasement, allowed Nintendo-branded games to be published on it. This device became the CD-i, an "interactive CD player" more meant for simple educational titles than for full games. Nevertheless, Nintendo games were made for the CD-i, and while generally liked at the time by reviewers, they eventually became highly unpopular, taking the CD-i's reputation down with them.
 
[[Category:Super Nintendo Entertainment System]]
 
[[Category:Super Nintendo Entertainment System]]

Latest revision as of 08:15, July 14, 2016

SNEScd

One design for the SNES CD-ROM was an add-on, akin to the Sega CD for the Genesis/Mega Drive.

The SNES CD-ROM was a planned CD drive for the SNES, similar to the Sega CD. It was developed by Nintendo together with Sony. Eventually the SNES-CD became the standalone Play Station, which took both SNES cartridges and CD-ROMs. However, Sony wanted the full rights to all games published for the SNES CD, so Nintendo instead went with Philips. One day after the Play Station announcement at CES 1991, Nintendo revealed its partnership with Philips.
SNES-PlayStation

Another design for the unit. This one was a standalone device, containing both Super Famicom hardware and the Super Disc CD drive.

Sony and Nintendo attempted to repair relations between each other, and in the end, Sony was allowed to continue development on SNES-compatible hardware. However, Sony decided later to create its own, competing console based on the Play Station. This eventually became the current Sony PlayStation. Philips' version of the SNES-CD later became the infamous CD-i.

HistoryEdit

Nintendo first courted Sony to develop a CD-based console in 1988, after both Sony and Philips had pitched their ideas to Nintendo. Nintendo decided to work with Sony, and development resulted first in the SNES-CD, a CD drive attachment for the SNES, and later the Play Station, a console that took both SNES cartridges and CD-ROMs. The Play Station was shown at the 1991 Consumer Electronics Show.

However, Sony's contract with Nintendo gave them the full rights to every game published for the device, so Nintendo then went with Philips. The deal was announced one day after the Play Station announcement.

PlayStation

This was the console that Nintendo inadvertently created - the Sony Playstation. It dominated the 64-bit era, trouncing Nintendo's own console, the Nintendo 64. Without their contributions it may never have been released, and Nintendo would have never gained its strongest rival.

Though Philips continued to work with Nintendo, Sony and Nintendo tried to make up with each other, and Nintendo eventually agreed to allow Sony to produce SNES-compatible hardware. Miffed by Nintendo's abandonment, Sony instead took the Play Station and turned it into its own standalone console, one which would eventually beat Nintendo's machine in the 64-bit era.

Nintendo then broke its deal with Philips, leaving itself with no CD drive in development. Philips was allowed to continue development on the device and, as appeasement, allowed Nintendo-branded games to be published on it. This device became the CD-i, an "interactive CD player" more meant for simple educational titles than for full games. Nevertheless, Nintendo games were made for the CD-i, and while generally liked at the time by reviewers, they eventually became highly unpopular, taking the CD-i's reputation down with them.

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.