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New Super Mario Bros. 2  (JP) (officially abbreviated as NSMB2) is the third installment in the New Super Mario Bros. series for the Nintendo 3DS. The game is a direct sequel to New Super Mario Bros. released in 2006 for the Nintendo DS and a follow-up 2009 Wii game New Super Mario Bros. Wii, which is a follow-up to the 2006 game. A follow-up, which is a sequel to the 2009 game, New Super Mario Bros. U was released on the Wii U in November 18, 2012.

It is also the thirteenth game in the main Mario series.

The game also is available both as a traditional boxed form on a card, and as a digital download though the Nintendo eShop. Excluding Virtual Console games, this is the first time Nintendo has released a game in both formats.

Gameplay

New Super Mario Bros 2 screenshot 1

A screenshot of gameplay

The game continues to use the general gameplay mechanics from previous New Super Mario Bros. titles. Players are able to play as both Mario and Luigi, supporting 2-player co-op.

The Super Leaf returns as a power-up, and functions much more like it did in Super Mario Bros. 3 in which Mario was given a pair of raccoon ears and a tail which allowed him to fly for a short time and slowly float to the ground.

This is unlike the Super Leaf's return in Super Mario 3D Land, which gave Mario a full Tanooki Suit and only allowed him to float to the ground. The biggest change in gameplay is the added abundance, and importance, of coins.

As players make their way through the game, a running total is kept of all the coins they've managed to collect, with the ultimate goal to amass one million coins.

This quest is aided by the inclusion of new power-ups such as gold rings that turn enemies into valuable gold versions and a Gold Flower that gives Mario the ability to turn almost anything in his path into coins.

Coin Rush

The Coin Rush mode allows players to collect as many coins as possible across three levels and challenge friends to beat their record via StreetPass.

Characters

Playable

  • Mario
  • Luigi

Enemies

New enemies

Recurring enemies

Bosses

Items

General

Power-ups

Downloadable Content

In addition to the included Gold Rush packs, Nintendo offered additional courses as DLC. The courses were mostly more difficult that the included ones. In Japan, as a part of a special 3DS LL promotion, people who bought a 3DS in August 2014 could use their voucher to purchase the Gold Edition of the game, which included all the dlc. This has yet to be released outside of Japan or normally.

Reception

The game has sold very well, selling 7.88 million units as of March 31, 2014 making it the 4th best selling 3DS game. In the United States, the game has sold 2.28 million.

Merchandise

A Nintendo 2DS bundle with New Super Mario Bros. 2 was released on August 25, 2017.

Development

The development of a 2D Super Mario game for the Nintendo 3DS was first brought up during an earnings briefing in November 2010, with Shigeru Miyamoto speaking about the possibilities of 2D and 3D Super Mario games on the Nintendo 3DS.[1] Later, after the release of Super Mario 3D Land, Satoru Iwata officially announced that a 2D Mario game for the 3DS was in development,[2] which was revealed to be New Super Mario Bros. 2 during the April 21, 2012, Nintendo Direct in Japan.[3]

New Super Mario Bros. 2 had a more unique development cycle than other games in the series. Not only was the game developed by the Entertainment Analysis and Development team, but also by members of other development teams, including the Software Planning and Development team, as part of the "Mario Cram School," a program meant to teach other teams about the development of Mario games.[4] Also different is that the game's stages were designed before the mechanics and main focus were thought of.[4]

The focus on coins came about early in development, with Takashi Tezuka and Toshihiko Nakago speaking about coins; at the time, development of Super Mario 3D Land, which features the ? Box, had recently wrapped up. The coin concept was first implemented with the golden Koopa Troopa, and soon after Tezuka suggested the one million coin goal. The developers then began to fill the stages with coins, and created more ways to collect them, such as the additional golden enemies and Gold Mario.[5] Because of the game's coin focus, the developers considered naming it "New Super Mario Bros. Gold," but the "2" was chosen instead since the game features more stages than the previous entries in the New Super Mario Bros. series as well as several new elements, allowing it to stand alone as a standard 2D Super Mario title.[6]

Implementation of the co-op mode was originally met with conflict; Tezuka suggested adding it, but the staff opposed him due to being unsure on how it could be implemented, and that it couldn't be done within the remainder of the given development timeframe. Earlier in development, a prototype mode featuring both Mario and Luigi in the single-player stages had been developed. Using this, the developers worked on refining it, making it more similar to New Super Mario Bros. Wii. Issues with the Nintendo 3DS' screen kept the camera from expanding to accommodate both players, so instead the camera was made to focus on a single player at a time, with both being able to fight for control over it.[7]

The concept of the Coin Rush mode was thought of before the coin theme of the game was. Yusuke Anamo was thinking about how to make the game more replayable, but also something that could be played even in free time. In addition, after making the stages more coin-oriented, the developers noticed that, no matter how often the game was played, the million-coin goal was very difficult to reach. It was then that they decided to incorporate collecting large amounts of coins into the new mode.[8] The Coin Rush downloadable course packs were originally announced before the game was released; the courses themselves, however, had not been created at the time.[9] The idea of downloadable content had come up during the development of both New Super Mario Bros. 2 and New Super Mario Bros. U, and from both teams; the development team for New Super Mario Bros. 2 had thought of the idea of downloadable Coin Rush courses, and since this game was to be released first it was decided that content would be created for it first.[10]

Pre-release and unused content

The game was originally to be titled New Super Mario Bros. Gold, but since the stages were said to stand on their own without the coin theme, the name was changed. The Platform Panic Pack Coin Rush DLC was also set to be released as the seventh pack, but with the announcement of the Gold Classics Pack it was moved to being pack eight.

References to other games

  • Mario Bros. - Round 1 is remade as part of the Gold Classics Pack.
  • Super Mario Bros. - In the first phase of Bowser's and Dry Bowser's battles, Bowser throws sledgehammers and breathes fire, and Mario must wait for him to jump then get past him, very much alike to this game. Also, while the game loads (such as when starting up the game or looking for a second player in Co-op Play), the loading chime plays the first part of this game's overworld theme. Small Mario sprite from Super Mario Bros. appears in some parts of Coin Rush mode, such as to show which course the player will play or while counting the coins obtained in the levels. The maximum number of lives results in crowns like in this game. World 1-1, 1-2 and 1-4 are remade as part of the Classic Courses Pack.
  • Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels - Not in the game itself, but the Gold Classics Pack DLC's third course at the ending had "Thank You!!" message similar to the Arigatou! message in World 9-4 (although unlike in that game, the "Thank You!!" message was written in coins rather than coral).
  • Super Mario Bros. 3 - A trailer released by Nintendo of Europe states that this game is the "rightful successor" to this game.[11] Raccoon Mario, the Power Meter, Jump Blocks, and Wooden Blocks return. The P-Wing makes a cameo, replacing the "P" icon of the Power Meter. The floor in Bowser's room is checkered, similar to those of several Fortresses in this game. Like in this game, Toad Houses have the same music (except for Green Toad Houses) and feature a choice of three power-ups. Also, the loading chime plays a small part of this game's overworld theme. The Toad Houses also play the music that they played in this game. World 1-1 and 1-5 are remade as part of the Classic Courses Pack.
  • Super Mario World - Chocolate Island backgrounds are used in some of the levels. Reznors and the battle theme return from this game. Also, when the bridge breaks in the Reznor battles it has a similar sound to the blocks when they break in this game, and when the player hits a switch, it makes the P Switch noises from this game. The loading chime plays a small part of this game's overworld theme. Mario and Luigi can look up as well. The Moon Coins have an imprint of a 3-Up Moon.
  • Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island - The number "two" on the logo is similar to this game.
  • Super Mario Sunshine - If Mario jumps on a Toad, its mushroom cap will bounce. If attacked from a distance, it will flinch. This feature first appeared in this game.
  • Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time: The giant coin makes a reappearance in this game, based on its appearance in Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time.
  • New Super Mario Bros. - A direct sequel to this game. Mario's mini form and mega forms return. Dry Bowser also returns. The game's remix of the Super Mario Bros. theme is used during the Dash Mario stages, as well as the Mega Mushroom theme.
  • Yoshi's Island DS - Bowser is fought as a giant in the background, just as he was in this game.
  • Super Mario Galaxy - The Toads' reaction to a raccoon tail whip (by spinning around happily) is reused from the Toads' reaction to a Star Spin in this game.
  • New Super Mario Bros. Wii - An indirect follow-up to this game. Numerous elements from the game return. The music and graphic style are reused from this game, with added vocals to the overworld and athletic themes, as well as vocal riffs "bah" included in the tower, castle and ghost house themes. The second phase of Bowser's battle can be compared to the second phase of Bowser in this game, except Mario needs to move from platform to platform vertically instead of horizontally. The bubble system returns, and the multiplayer gameplay is reused (though Mario and Luigi cannot pick up each other as before). The Koopalings also had the same voices from and also taunt the same way before they fight and are fought similarly to New Super Mario Bros. Wii. In addition, they also aided Bowser in a manner very similar to how Kamek aided Bowser in that game, right down to being knocked down by Bowser the same way upon his becoming giant. Stars can be earned on the file, like in this game.
  • Super Mario 3D Land - The Invincibility Leaf returns, as does the Assist Block. Peepas, Coin Coffers, and Goomba Towers return. Toad Houses use the same music as in this game, which, in itself, is a remix of the theme from Super Mario Bros. 3. During the credits, Mario carries Peach in a similar fashion to this game, except he is not flying, but walking on the ground. + Clocks return with similar functions. Once again, items from Toad Houses work their effects immediately, rather than being placed in an inventory. Stars can be earned in the file, like in New Super Mario Bros. Wii and this game. The max lives are 1,110 (shown as three crowns), like in this game.
  • Mario Kart 7 - Raccoon Mario's tail whip and transformation sounds are re-used from this game.

References in later games

Trivia

  • New Super Mario Bros. 2 was released in North America the same day as the Nintendo 3DS XL (the second console in the 3DS family).
  • It was the first 3DS retail game to be sold in the 3DS eShop.
  • Getting 1 million coins unlocks a new title screen.
  • This is the only New Super Mario Bros. game to not feature Bowser Jr. as a boss, making Bowser the only boss to be featured in every New Super Mario Bros. game.
  • This game has the most levels out of any New Super Mario Bros. game, with a total of 93 levels.
    • Similarly, it also has the largest amount of total exits out of any New Super Mario Bros. game, with a total of 108 exits.
  • US and Canada Club Nintendo members who purchased New Super Mario Bros. 2 from the Nintendo eShop by September 20th, 2012 and completed the surveys within four weeks after downloading could receive double the amount of coins (for a total of 100 coins) as they would receive if they bought the game at retail (50 coins).[12]. European Club Nintendo members that purchased the game from the Nintendo eShop received 250 free Stars. Likewise, Australian Club Nintendo members received double the amount of Stars (i.e. 400 instead of 200)[13].
  • Nintendo made a special gold-themed week on the American Nintendo eShop to celebrate the release of the game, where every category's image was replaced with something from the game and the backgrounds were gold-colored; in other regions, however, this did not occur.

References

  1. 3DS to have 3D and 2D Mario Games -- Andriasang.com
  2. New 2D Mario Coming to 3DS - IGN
  3. Nintendo Direct Japan - Full Show - 21.4.2012 - YouTube
  4. 4.0 4.1 Iwata Asks : New Super Mario Bros. 2 : Mario Cram School
  5. Iwata Asks : New Super Mario Bros. 2 : "Shouldn't This One Be About Coins?"
  6. Iwata Asks : New Super Mario Bros. 2 : Classic Super Mario
  7. Iwata Asks : New Super Mario Bros. 2 : Team Up to Strike it Rich
  8. Iwata Asks : New Super Mario Bros. 2 : "I Don't Like It."
  9. New Super Mario Bros 2 DLC and more detailed in new trailer | GamesRadar
  10. Iwata Asks : New Super Luigi U : Overtaken by New Super Mario Bros. 2
  11. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSDWF7xwke8
  12. https://club.nintendo.com/double-coins-nsmb2.do
  13. http://gamesites.nintendo.com.au/double-stars-nsmb2/
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